How to Make Your Google Search Snippets More Clickable

An alarming digital marketing trend should scare all online publishers: Organic traffic from Google is vanishing:

  • Google’s latest search elements (featured snippets and People Also Ask) steal clicks from organic listings.
  • The first three positions account for over 50% of clicks. This means that you’re still “buried” on the bottom or middle of Page 1.
  • Organic click-through rate (CTR) is declining across the board: The top position had a CTR of 38.7% in May 2014. As of June 2019, it was 31.0%.

On top of all that, most browser-based searches on Google result in zero clicks:

chart showing paid, organic, and zero-click searches in google.
Zero-click searches result from Google’s ability to give quick answers on search result pages—current local weather, definitions, solutions to math problems, currency conversions, etc. (Image source)

Yet, Google remains the most effective online traffic source. With more than 3.5 billion searches a day (and 1.2 trillion per year) worldwide, a presence on Google isn’t optional. If a business isn’t on Google, it doesn’t exist.

Search (read: Google) is still where most buying journeys start. It’s also the only scalable, sustainable source of free traffic. You may not like the trend, but there’s no alternative to Google’s traffic. So how can you still get organic clicks from a Google SERP?

Making your search snippets more clickable is a good place to start. Whether you rank first or fifth, improving your click-through rate is low-hanging fruit that will impact your bottom line—without a major investment in link-building or dedicated marketing campaign.

Here are things you can do to improve your click-through rate in Google.

There’s an accepted truth from email marketing: The more clickable links you have in your email, the more clicks you get. When web users see something that looks like a link, they feel compelled to click it. Links invite clicks; it’s as simple as that.

The same principle applies to Google’s search snippets. The only difference is that we can’t directly edit links’ appearance on a search results page (SERP) or—more importantly—how many links they choose to include.

There are two ways to increase your odds of having more than one clickable link inside your search snippet:

Create an on-page clickable table of contents.

Have you ever seen “Jump to” links inside a search snippet? They take you right to the part of the page with the information you’re searching for. Here’s what they look like:

example of clickable table of contents in search results via jump links in document.

And here’s what populates that link from the document:

page screenshot showing jump link that generates in-SERP table of contents.

Google’s “Jump to” link is populated by a “named anchor” HTML element that identifies (or “names”) a part of the document.

There are two ways to add these:

Optimize for mini-sitelinks.

While generic sitelinks usually appear for navigational queries, mini-sitelinks may be triggered for all kinds of searches, and there may be more than one search snippet with mini-sitelinks on a SERP.

Both types of sitelinks rely on on-page navigation (and whether Google deems your navigational links relevant to the current query). This is what mini-sitelinks look like for an informational query:

example of mini-sitelinks in search results.

You don’t have control over mini-sitelinks, but you can increase your odds of earning them. Google uses on-page clues to generate mini-sitelinks, especially:

  • On-page tables of contents (see above);
  • Related content blocks underneath your content. This is the case in the screenshot above. Mini-sitelinks are populated from a “related reading” block underneath the article:
example of on-page content that generates mini-sitelinks.

Having both (named anchors and related content blocks) increase your chances of getting those extra links.

2. Get more words in bold in your search snippet.

Bold font immediately attracts user eyes. Within search snippets, Google highlights certain words in bold to help users choose the best result. Having more words in bold inside your search snippet will help it stand out and likely attract more clicks.

Here’s how you can ensure that more words are highlighted in bold in your search snippets:

Use your target query strategically.

This is an easy one: Google will bold the query (or part of the query) that the user typed into the search box:

example of bolded words in meta description based on search query.

The obvious solution is to use your target query in your content (more than once) to give Google more opportunities to generate a search snippet with those words in bold. Note that I’m not talking about keyword density, a concept that should have been long forgotten (yet stubbornly reappears in our industry).

Strategic keyword usage means using your target query in prominent places around your document to ensure search crawlers and human readers instantly see them when landing on the page.

I previously wrote a detailed guide on keyword research, which lists places to include your target query:

  • Headline;
  • URL slug;
  • First paragraph;
  • Subheadings.
tool that helps identify the use of keywords in article copy.

Use related terms and synonyms.

Google has long moved away from exact keyword matching. These days, they understand search queries in context. Specifically, Google can understand closely related words as well as synonyms, which they often highlight in search results:

example showing how google bolds synonyms and related terms, not just exact-match keywords.
Google bolds related terms—not just exact keyword matches—that relate to the query.

You’re likely doing this already without realizing it. Good writers use varied vocabulary and include synonymous phrases and concepts without thinking about “click-through optimization.”

However, being a bit more strategic about it will help you on many fronts, including creating better, more thorough copy, improving your organic rankings, and, yes, increasing your click-through rate (CTR).

Tools you can use to make this easier

Ahrefs

Ahrefs has a cool section inside their “Keyword explorer” called “All keyword ideas.” This section offers “keyword extensions” (i.e. extending your base term into a longer phrase) and lists closely related terms you should consider using in your content.

To use the tool to go beyond your core term, use the “Exclude” filter to filter out phrases containing it:

screenshot of ahrefs to show how you can identify related terms.

Text Optimizer

Text Optimizer is the semantic research tool that goes right to the source—Google’s search snippets. It uses that data to generate a list of closely related terms and concepts.

You need to use common sense and editorial judgement to pick terms you want to use, but if you choose at least 25, you’re likely to see an organic visibility boost (i.e. higher rankings) and higher search snippet CTR:

screenshot of text optimizer that shows how to identify related terms.

The tool also helps you use those important phrases in close proximity. Click any term, and it generates possible sentences for you to use:

screenshot of text optimizer showing ways to join related keywords.

3. Structure your content well.

Optimize for enhanced snippets with structured markup.

Structured markup adds code to a webpage to make it easier for search crawlers to understand, extract, and display key information in SERPs.

When it comes to the actual search snippets, Google supports a limited number of structured markup types. Most supported structured markup helps Google include data in additional search elements (e.g., brand knowledge graph elements, video and image carousels, claim-review resultsbook reviews, etc.)

source: https://conversionxl.com/blog/google-search-snippets/

resources: https://www.beuniquegroup.com/blog/google-ads-campaign-3-mistakes-limiting-you-from-getting-results/
https://www.beuniquegroup.com/google-ads-management/
https://landing.google.com/academyforads/

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